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Get ready for the second ever Sherlock Holmes day on May 22nd




Every day is a 'day', it seems, and Sherlock Holmes Day comes in the same month as Nutty Fudge Day and Root Canal Appreciation Day


This Sunday, 22nd May, sees the second ever Sherlock Holmes day.

What does that mean? No one's sure. After all, it doesn't seem that hard to get attributed a 'day'. Every day is a 'day', it seems, and Sherlock Holmes Day comes in the same month as Nutty Fudge Day and Root Canal Appreciation Day (we're beginning to suspect that some of these might be paid for).

But, if it's simply another step in the journey towards recognising and celebrating the greatest consulting detective of all time, then unfurl the bunting and send out the themed party invitations, we're in. 

The reasoning behind it being 22nd May is that it's Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's birthday. Although, to many people that will mean nothing. Because, according to a 2012 survey, 21% of Brits think Sherlock Holmes was a real person.

But, sadly, he was 'merely' the creation of Doyle (he's often referred to as Conan Doyle, but the compound surname is actually an affectation; Conan was a middle name, and the correct family name was simply Doyle). He featured Holmes in 56 short stories and just four novels.

Other detectives have been worked much harder by their creators (there are already 20 full length 'Rebus' books), but none, not even Marple or Morse, have had the same cultural impact as Holmes.

In fact, Morse is Holmes, right? A cerebral, cultured and fiercely private detective, often at loggerheads with more pedestrian senior officers, who affects exasperation with a more yeomanry assistant for whom he actually has great respect and deep affection. Jesus, Mrs Hudson could crack that one.

So, let's abandon cynicism, ignore the irritating proximity of Lost Sock Day (not even kidding) and instead celebrate the 'life' and times of Sherlock Holmes, the greatest detective there never was - and keep our fingers crossed that the rumours of a January 2017 return for the BBC's modern adaptation are true.

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